Notable Phi Beta Kappans at UNL

Hartley Alexander

Hartley Burr Alexander
1916

Developed themes for the program of art and symbolism in the Nebraska State Capitol.
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Benjamin Andrews

Benjamin Andrews
1870, Brown University

Chancellor of University of Nebraska 1900-1908. Andrews Hall is named for him.
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Alan Heeger

Alan Heeger
1957

Nobel Prize Winner in Chemistry, 2000.
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Theodore Jorgensen

Theodore Jorgensen
1928

Professor of Physics, UNL. Jorgensen Hall is named for him.
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Robert E. Knoll

Robert E. Knoll
1943

Professor of English, UNL. Knoll Residence Hall is named for him.
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Cynthia Lange-Kubick

Cynthia Lange-Kubick
2008

Columnist, Lincoln Journal Star.
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Glenna Luschei

Glenna Luschei
1956

Endowed the Prairie Schooner in perpetuity with a fund through the University of Nebraska Foundation.
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J. B. Milliken

J. B. Milliken
1980

President of the University of Nebraska, 2004-2014.
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John G. Neihardt

John G. Neihardt
1972

Poet Laureate, State of Nebraska.  Writer of Black Elk Speaks.
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Louise Pound

Louise Pound
1896

Professor of English, UNL. Pound Residence Hall is named for her.
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Roscoe Pound

Roscoe Pound
1896

Dean of Nebraska College of Law, 1903-1907. Dean of Harvard Law School.
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Ted Sorensen

Theodore "Ted" Sorensen
1949

Speechwriter and adviser for President John F. Kennedy.
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Lowry Wimberly

Lowry C. Wimberly
1916

Creator and first editor of Prairie Schooner magazine in 1926.
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Jorgensen Hall was dedicated on October 29th, 2010. Alan Heeger (B.S. 1957), who won the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 2000, was the keynote speaker. He recounted how the highlight of his undergraduate years was a course in modern physics taught by Ted Jorgensen that introduced him to quantum physics. Also, he related that he once asked Ted Jorgensen how to succeed in physics. Jorgensen’s answer surprised him: Jorgensen inquired about Heeger’s grades in English. Ted then went on to explain that being able to communicate well, both verbally and in writing, were essential to success as a scientist.

Spectrum Newsletter, No. 25, page 3